mclaren_f1 | cars

   Talented South African designer Gordon Murray was pretty much given carte blanche to design the world's best and fastest driver's car. This McLaren would go head to head with Ferrari, Porsche and Lamborghini exotic street machines. Murray's curriculum vitae already sported several championship winning F1 cars, including the 1988 McLaren MP4/4. Murray first informed the world of McLaren's plans in 1989 when he showed a design sketch of the upcoming Formula 1 inspired supercar. It would take another three years, before the aptly named McLaren F1 was shown to the public at the start of the Monaco Grand Prix weekend. That race was fittingly won by McLaren's Ayrton Senna. It was not his only road car project as in his spare time Murray was also working on another unique car that would be later sold as the 'Light Car Company Rocket'. This motorcycle-engined machine was built to a completely different concept and specs than the McLaren road car, so the two projects did not conflict.
   Murray used his connections with BMW dating back from his Brabham days to broker a deal with the company's engine specialist Paul Rosche to supply a bespoke V12 engine. In keeping with the F1's design philosophy, the engine had to be both lightweight and powerful. BMW not only met the requirements, but with its 6.1 litre, 627 bhp V12 engine exceeded the 550 bhp set, although it was slightly heavier than asked for. The lightweight V12 engine was mounted amidships and mated to a McLaren-developed six speed manual gearbox. To better insulate the heat from the tight engine bay, the engine and exhaust covers were covered in gold, which is highly reflective. Missing from the very slippery Peter Stevens designed exterior, was a big wing that thanks to the likes of Ferrari and Lamborghini had become a super trademark. Banned by that time in Formula 1, Murray was free to use ground effects and moving aerodynamics for the McLaren road car. Reminiscent to his 1978 Brabham F1 car, the McLaren F1 was fitted with two electric fans to suck the car to the ground. Hidden when stationary, the car also sported a small moveable wing on the tail of the car that offered stability at high speed, served as an airbrake and an additional cooling vent for the rear brakes. These advanced devices provided plenty of downforce, but without the drag created by the familiar big wings...

1994 McLaren F1

+ S1 tuning version

Standart

S1 version

BMW S70/2 60º V12

Displacement 6,064 cc 

Valvetrain 4 valves / cylinder, DOHC

Naturally Aspirated

Power 620 bhp  @ 7,400 rpm

Torque 650 Nm  @ 5,600 rpm

Red Line 7,500 rpm

Suspension Standart

Transverse 6 speed Manual

Rear wheel drive

Weight 1.140 kilo 

 

BMW S70/2 60º V12

Displacement 6,064 cc 

Valvetrain 4 valves / cylinder, DOHC

Naturally Aspirated

Power 650 bhp  @ 7,400 rpm

Torque 690 Nm  @ 5,600 rpm

Red Line 7,500 rpm

Suspension Sport

Transverse 6 speed Manual

Rear wheel drive

Weight 1.100 kilo
New rims Konig Britelite 

 

05.12.2018